Anchors & Anvils

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X-pro1 with one of our java brown leather straps in Florida on a newly refinished mid century stool - Kaylee- @hikayleejoan #photos #pic #pics #Vsco #vscocam #snapseed #picture #pictures #snapshot #art #beautiful #instagood #picoftheday #photooftheday #color #all_shots #exposure #composition #focus #capture #moment #camera #photography

Vintage cameras forever - #photo #photos #pic #pics #Vsco #vscocam #snapseed #picture #pictures #snapshot #art #beautiful #instagood #picoftheday #photooftheday #color #all_shots #exposure #composition #focus #capture #moment #camera #photography

FujiFilm X-Pro1 review using manual lenses

Fujifilm X-PRO1 & Vintage Manual Lenses


We recently decided that we would like some change around the shop. For years we have been using canon DSLR’s and are currently using a 5Dmkii. While happy with the canon, it simply could not do all of the things we wanted it to do so we finally splurged and purchased a FujiFilm X-Pro1. We were debating purchasing a macro lens for photographing our logos on the leather camera straps that we make as well as other fine detail shots. We soon realized that for the price of a macro lens we could essentially purchase an X-PRO1 with the 35mm ƒ/1.4, and that solves our problem because the fuji has an on board macro mode.

We opted for the 35mm ƒ/1.4 lens which we feel is a fantastic lens, but we obviously love our film cameras too. We wanted to touch on a few film lenses we see little coverage about online. We purchased two adapters and gave 4 of our film lenses a go around the back yard to see which one preformed the best for us. (please note: we will be purchasing a pentax adapter as well as a canon adapter in the near future) 

Each photo was tested under similar circumstances and processed in lightroom. The photos had contrast, blacks, s-curve, exposure etc altered, however, saturation and color altering was kept to zero.

The purpose of this test was not necessarily accuracy, we simply wanted to show what was possible with vintage lenses on a modern fuji camera and demonstrate each lenses unique bokeh characteristics


The lenses we will be testing are: 

Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2 USSR Made M42 Mount
Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4
Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount
Ashai Pentax Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



 

We opted not to test the 28mm on this subject in part because we forgot and also due to the fact that we found its lack of bokeh to be somewhat boring.


Bokehlicious?


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



The Mamiya Sekor was a lens that we honestly doubted we would like. It felt as if it were probably a cheap lens when it was made. The ƒ/2 had us originally stubbing our noses, however, after using this lens we truly fell in love. The bokeh is smooth and to us, seemed less extreme in most cases. Honestly though we did not fall in love with this lens for the bokeh, we will explain more below. 


Each one of the lenses that we tested appeared to completely change how the X-PRO1 preformed. The Helios had what we would call dreamy bokeh. It swirled and was very pronounced while still being soft


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


The grand daddy, the heavy, large, ant frying, mad scientist magna-fine glass of the bunch is the minolta 58mm ƒ/1.4. We have had this lens sitting around the shop forever on a minolta x-700. This lens is a fantastic portrait lens and on a cropped sensor like the one in the X-PRO1 gives it close to that perfect 85mm portrait length that all professional photographers swear by. Fuji earlier this year released the 56mm ƒ1.2 that had most photographers drooling, us included. While we wanted it desperately, we simply could not justify the cost as of right now. We remembered this bad boy in the camera case and figured it was so close to being the same lens (in regards to length and aperture) that we would HAVE to buy an adapter and give it a test. 



This lens did not disappoint! At ƒ/1.4 this lens will throw more boekh then most people could handle! We were caught up in shooting everything at 1.4, however, when we stopped down to ƒ/2 our jaws dropped. This camera stopped down two stops makes it razor sharp on our fuji sensor while still providing plenty of beautiful bokeh.


@ ƒ/1.4





@ ƒ/2





@ ƒ/2.8





Sharpness

After trying all three lenses it became clear which lens was in fact the sharpest in our tests. The Helios was quite sharp but we found it somewhat tricky to focus accurately. When the focus did hit, however, we were very pleased. The Minolta offered that wide aperture all photographers want, however, the lens was somewhat soft at 1.4 requiring that it be stopped down. Stopping down is not a problem, but when you have a ƒ/1.4 lens you will typically want to shoot at ƒ/1.4. 

The Winner : The Mamiya Sekor in our tests was always the sharpest. We don’t just mean on a computer at 100% crop we mean even in camera we could see a difference. The Mamiya was also the easiest and quickest to focus. After each picture we would look at the LCD and could not believe the photos were being taken with a manual focus lens with being hand held with our shaky hands. The Mamiya leaves some bokeh to be desired, however, this lens almost made us think that we could use it for paid work with out thinking twice. We found our results to be impressive considering the lens can be had on ebay for $10-$20 and the M42 adapter on amazon costs $11. It surprised us and would no way shape or form been a lens we would have selected on our own. We hope these photos will help you determine which lens might be right for you and your needs.


Lens Test Galleries


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount


Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5

FujiFilm X-Pro1 review using manual lenses

Fujifilm X-PRO1 & Vintage Manual Lenses


We recently decided that we would like some change around the shop. For years we have been using canon DSLR’s and are currently using a 5Dmkii. While happy with the canon, it simply could not do all of the things we wanted it to do so we finally splurged and purchased a FujiFilm X-Pro1. We were debating purchasing a macro lens for photographing our logos on the leather camera straps that we make as well as other fine detail shots. We soon realized that for the price of a macro lens we could essentially purchase an X-PRO1 with the 35mm ƒ/1.4, and that solves our problem because the fuji has an on board macro mode.

We opted for the 35mm ƒ/1.4 lens which we feel is a fantastic lens, but we obviously love our film cameras too. We wanted to touch on a few film lenses we see little coverage about online. We purchased two adapters and gave 4 of our film lenses a go around the back yard to see which one preformed the best for us. (please note: we will be purchasing a pentax adapter as well as a canon adapter in the near future) 

Each photo was tested under similar circumstances and processed in lightroom. The photos had contrast, blacks, s-curve, exposure etc altered, however, saturation and color altering was kept to zero.

The purpose of this test was not necessarily accuracy, we simply wanted to show what was possible with vintage lenses on a modern fuji camera and demonstrate each lenses unique bokeh characteristics


The lenses we will be testing are: 

Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2 USSR Made M42 Mount
Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4
Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount
Ashai Pentax Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



 

We opted not to test the 28mm on this subject in part because we forgot and also due to the fact that we found its lack of bokeh to be somewhat boring.


Bokehlicious?


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



The Mamiya Sekor was a lens that we honestly doubted we would like. It felt as if it were probably a cheap lens when it was made. The ƒ/2 had us originally stubbing our noses, however, after using this lens we truly fell in love. The bokeh is smooth and to us, seemed less extreme in most cases. Honestly though we did not fall in love with this lens for the bokeh, we will explain more below. 


Each one of the lenses that we tested appeared to completely change how the X-PRO1 preformed. The Helios had what we would call dreamy bokeh. It swirled and was very pronounced while still being soft


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


The grand daddy, the heavy, large, ant frying, mad scientist magna-fine glass of the bunch is the minolta 58mm ƒ/1.4. We have had this lens sitting around the shop forever on a minolta x-700. This lens is a fantastic portrait lens and on a cropped sensor like the one in the X-PRO1 gives it close to that perfect 85mm portrait length that all professional photographers swear by. Fuji earlier this year released the 56mm ƒ1.2 that had most photographers drooling, us included. While we wanted it desperately, we simply could not justify the cost as of right now. We remembered this bad boy in the camera case and figured it was so close to being the same lens (in regards to length and aperture) that we would HAVE to buy an adapter and give it a test. 



This lens did not disappoint! At ƒ/1.4 this lens will throw more boekh then most people could handle! We were caught up in shooting everything at 1.4, however, when we stopped down to ƒ/2 our jaws dropped. This camera stopped down two stops makes it razor sharp on our fuji sensor while still providing plenty of beautiful bokeh.


@ ƒ/1.4





@ ƒ/2





@ ƒ/2.8





Sharpness

After trying all three lenses it became clear which lens was in fact the sharpest in our tests. The Helios was quite sharp but we found it somewhat tricky to focus accurately. When the focus did hit, however, we were very pleased. The Minolta offered that wide aperture all photographers want, however, the lens was somewhat soft at 1.4 requiring that it be stopped down. Stopping down is not a problem, but when you have a ƒ/1.4 lens you will typically want to shoot at ƒ/1.4. 

The Winner : The Mamiya Sekor in our tests was always the sharpest. We don’t just mean on a computer at 100% crop we mean even in camera we could see a difference. The Mamiya was also the easiest and quickest to focus. After each picture we would look at the LCD and could not believe the photos were being taken with a manual focus lens with being hand held with our shaky hands. The Mamiya leaves some bokeh to be desired, however, this lens almost made us think that we could use it for paid work with out thinking twice. We found our results to be impressive considering the lens can be had on ebay for $10-$20 and the M42 adapter on amazon costs $11. It surprised us and would no way shape or form been a lens we would have selected on our own. We hope these photos will help you determine which lens might be right for you and your needs.


Lens Test Galleries


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount


Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5

FujiFilm X-Pro1 review using manual lenses

Fujifilm X-PRO1 & Vintage Manual Lenses


We recently decided that we would like some change around the shop. For years we have been using canon DSLR’s and are currently using a 5Dmkii. While happy with the canon, it simply could not do all of the things we wanted it to do so we finally splurged and purchased a FujiFilm X-Pro1. We were debating purchasing a macro lens for photographing our logos on the leather camera straps that we make as well as other fine detail shots. We soon realized that for the price of a macro lens we could essentially purchase an X-PRO1 with the 35mm ƒ/1.4, and that solves our problem because the fuji has an on board macro mode.

We opted for the 35mm ƒ/1.4 lens which we feel is a fantastic lens, but we obviously love our film cameras too. We wanted to touch on a few film lenses we see little coverage about online. We purchased two adapters and gave 4 of our film lenses a go around the back yard to see which one preformed the best for us. (please note: we will be purchasing a pentax adapter as well as a canon adapter in the near future) 

Each photo was tested under similar circumstances and processed in lightroom. The photos had contrast, blacks, s-curve, exposure etc altered, however, saturation and color altering was kept to zero.

The purpose of this test was not necessarily accuracy, we simply wanted to show what was possible with vintage lenses on a modern fuji camera and demonstrate each lenses unique bokeh characteristics


The lenses we will be testing are: 

Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2 USSR Made M42 Mount
Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4
Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount
Ashai Pentax Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



 

We opted not to test the 28mm on this subject in part because we forgot and also due to the fact that we found its lack of bokeh to be somewhat boring.


Bokehlicious?


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



The Mamiya Sekor was a lens that we honestly doubted we would like. It felt as if it were probably a cheap lens when it was made. The ƒ/2 had us originally stubbing our noses, however, after using this lens we truly fell in love. The bokeh is smooth and to us, seemed less extreme in most cases. Honestly though we did not fall in love with this lens for the bokeh, we will explain more below. 


Each one of the lenses that we tested appeared to completely change how the X-PRO1 preformed. The Helios had what we would call dreamy bokeh. It swirled and was very pronounced while still being soft


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


The grand daddy, the heavy, large, ant frying, mad scientist magna-fine glass of the bunch is the minolta 58mm ƒ/1.4. We have had this lens sitting around the shop forever on a minolta x-700. This lens is a fantastic portrait lens and on a cropped sensor like the one in the X-PRO1 gives it close to that perfect 85mm portrait length that all professional photographers swear by. Fuji earlier this year released the 56mm ƒ1.2 that had most photographers drooling, us included. While we wanted it desperately, we simply could not justify the cost as of right now. We remembered this bad boy in the camera case and figured it was so close to being the same lens (in regards to length and aperture) that we would HAVE to buy an adapter and give it a test. 



This lens did not disappoint! At ƒ/1.4 this lens will throw more boekh then most people could handle! We were caught up in shooting everything at 1.4, however, when we stopped down to ƒ/2 our jaws dropped. This camera stopped down two stops makes it razor sharp on our fuji sensor while still providing plenty of beautiful bokeh.


@ ƒ/1.4





@ ƒ/2





@ ƒ/2.8





Sharpness

After trying all three lenses it became clear which lens was in fact the sharpest in our tests. The Helios was quite sharp but we found it somewhat tricky to focus accurately. When the focus did hit, however, we were very pleased. The Minolta offered that wide aperture all photographers want, however, the lens was somewhat soft at 1.4 requiring that it be stopped down. Stopping down is not a problem, but when you have a ƒ/1.4 lens you will typically want to shoot at ƒ/1.4. 

The Winner : The Mamiya Sekor in our tests was always the sharpest. We don’t just mean on a computer at 100% crop we mean even in camera we could see a difference. The Mamiya was also the easiest and quickest to focus. After each picture we would look at the LCD and could not believe the photos were being taken with a manual focus lens with being hand held with our shaky hands. The Mamiya leaves some bokeh to be desired, however, this lens almost made us think that we could use it for paid work with out thinking twice. We found our results to be impressive considering the lens can be had on ebay for $10-$20 and the M42 adapter on amazon costs $11. It surprised us and would no way shape or form been a lens we would have selected on our own. We hope these photos will help you determine which lens might be right for you and your needs.


Lens Test Galleries


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount


Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5

FujiFilm X-Pro1 review using manual lenses

Fujifilm X-PRO1 & Vintage Manual Lenses


We recently decided that we would like some change around the shop. For years we have been using canon DSLR’s and are currently using a 5Dmkii. While happy with the canon, it simply could not do all of the things we wanted it to do so we finally splurged and purchased a FujiFilm X-Pro1. We were debating purchasing a macro lens for photographing our logos on the leather camera straps that we make as well as other fine detail shots. We soon realized that for the price of a macro lens we could essentially purchase an X-PRO1 with the 35mm ƒ/1.4, and that solves our problem because the fuji has an on board macro mode.

We opted for the 35mm ƒ/1.4 lens which we feel is a fantastic lens, but we obviously love our film cameras too. We wanted to touch on a few film lenses we see little coverage about online. We purchased two adapters and gave 4 of our film lenses a go around the back yard to see which one preformed the best for us. (please note: we will be purchasing a pentax adapter as well as a canon adapter in the near future) 

Each photo was tested under similar circumstances and processed in lightroom. The photos had contrast, blacks, s-curve, exposure etc altered, however, saturation and color altering was kept to zero.

The purpose of this test was not necessarily accuracy, we simply wanted to show what was possible with vintage lenses on a modern fuji camera and demonstrate each lenses unique bokeh characteristics


The lenses we will be testing are: 

Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2 USSR Made M42 Mount
Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4
Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount
Ashai Pentax Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



 

We opted not to test the 28mm on this subject in part because we forgot and also due to the fact that we found its lack of bokeh to be somewhat boring.


Bokehlicious?


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



The Mamiya Sekor was a lens that we honestly doubted we would like. It felt as if it were probably a cheap lens when it was made. The ƒ/2 had us originally stubbing our noses, however, after using this lens we truly fell in love. The bokeh is smooth and to us, seemed less extreme in most cases. Honestly though we did not fall in love with this lens for the bokeh, we will explain more below. 


Each one of the lenses that we tested appeared to completely change how the X-PRO1 preformed. The Helios had what we would call dreamy bokeh. It swirled and was very pronounced while still being soft


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


The grand daddy, the heavy, large, ant frying, mad scientist magna-fine glass of the bunch is the minolta 58mm ƒ/1.4. We have had this lens sitting around the shop forever on a minolta x-700. This lens is a fantastic portrait lens and on a cropped sensor like the one in the X-PRO1 gives it close to that perfect 85mm portrait length that all professional photographers swear by. Fuji earlier this year released the 56mm ƒ1.2 that had most photographers drooling, us included. While we wanted it desperately, we simply could not justify the cost as of right now. We remembered this bad boy in the camera case and figured it was so close to being the same lens (in regards to length and aperture) that we would HAVE to buy an adapter and give it a test. 



This lens did not disappoint! At ƒ/1.4 this lens will throw more boekh then most people could handle! We were caught up in shooting everything at 1.4, however, when we stopped down to ƒ/2 our jaws dropped. This camera stopped down two stops makes it razor sharp on our fuji sensor while still providing plenty of beautiful bokeh.


@ ƒ/1.4





@ ƒ/2





@ ƒ/2.8





Sharpness

After trying all three lenses it became clear which lens was in fact the sharpest in our tests. The Helios was quite sharp but we found it somewhat tricky to focus accurately. When the focus did hit, however, we were very pleased. The Minolta offered that wide aperture all photographers want, however, the lens was somewhat soft at 1.4 requiring that it be stopped down. Stopping down is not a problem, but when you have a ƒ/1.4 lens you will typically want to shoot at ƒ/1.4. 

The Winner : The Mamiya Sekor in our tests was always the sharpest. We don’t just mean on a computer at 100% crop we mean even in camera we could see a difference. The Mamiya was also the easiest and quickest to focus. After each picture we would look at the LCD and could not believe the photos were being taken with a manual focus lens with being hand held with our shaky hands. The Mamiya leaves some bokeh to be desired, however, this lens almost made us think that we could use it for paid work with out thinking twice. We found our results to be impressive considering the lens can be had on ebay for $10-$20 and the M42 adapter on amazon costs $11. It surprised us and would no way shape or form been a lens we would have selected on our own. We hope these photos will help you determine which lens might be right for you and your needs.


Lens Test Galleries


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount


Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5

FujiFilm X-Pro1 review using manual lenses

Fujifilm X-PRO1 & Vintage Manual Lenses


We recently decided that we would like some change around the shop. For years we have been using canon DSLR’s and are currently using a 5Dmkii. While happy with the canon, it simply could not do all of the things we wanted it to do so we finally splurged and purchased a FujiFilm X-Pro1. We were debating purchasing a macro lens for photographing our logos on the leather camera straps that we make as well as other fine detail shots. We soon realized that for the price of a macro lens we could essentially purchase an X-PRO1 with the 35mm ƒ/1.4, and that solves our problem because the fuji has an on board macro mode.

We opted for the 35mm ƒ/1.4 lens which we feel is a fantastic lens, but we obviously love our film cameras too. We wanted to touch on a few film lenses we see little coverage about online. We purchased two adapters and gave 4 of our film lenses a go around the back yard to see which one preformed the best for us. (please note: we will be purchasing a pentax adapter as well as a canon adapter in the near future) 

Each photo was tested under similar circumstances and processed in lightroom. The photos had contrast, blacks, s-curve, exposure etc altered, however, saturation and color altering was kept to zero.

The purpose of this test was not necessarily accuracy, we simply wanted to show what was possible with vintage lenses on a modern fuji camera and demonstrate each lenses unique bokeh characteristics


The lenses we will be testing are: 

Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2 USSR Made M42 Mount
Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4
Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount
Ashai Pentax Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2



Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



 

We opted not to test the 28mm on this subject in part because we forgot and also due to the fact that we found its lack of bokeh to be somewhat boring.


Bokehlicious?


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount



The Mamiya Sekor was a lens that we honestly doubted we would like. It felt as if it were probably a cheap lens when it was made. The ƒ/2 had us originally stubbing our noses, however, after using this lens we truly fell in love. The bokeh is smooth and to us, seemed less extreme in most cases. Honestly though we did not fall in love with this lens for the bokeh, we will explain more below. 


Each one of the lenses that we tested appeared to completely change how the X-PRO1 preformed. The Helios had what we would call dreamy bokeh. It swirled and was very pronounced while still being soft


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount



Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


The grand daddy, the heavy, large, ant frying, mad scientist magna-fine glass of the bunch is the minolta 58mm ƒ/1.4. We have had this lens sitting around the shop forever on a minolta x-700. This lens is a fantastic portrait lens and on a cropped sensor like the one in the X-PRO1 gives it close to that perfect 85mm portrait length that all professional photographers swear by. Fuji earlier this year released the 56mm ƒ1.2 that had most photographers drooling, us included. While we wanted it desperately, we simply could not justify the cost as of right now. We remembered this bad boy in the camera case and figured it was so close to being the same lens (in regards to length and aperture) that we would HAVE to buy an adapter and give it a test. 



This lens did not disappoint! At ƒ/1.4 this lens will throw more boekh then most people could handle! We were caught up in shooting everything at 1.4, however, when we stopped down to ƒ/2 our jaws dropped. This camera stopped down two stops makes it razor sharp on our fuji sensor while still providing plenty of beautiful bokeh.


@ ƒ/1.4





@ ƒ/2





@ ƒ/2.8





Sharpness

After trying all three lenses it became clear which lens was in fact the sharpest in our tests. The Helios was quite sharp but we found it somewhat tricky to focus accurately. When the focus did hit, however, we were very pleased. The Minolta offered that wide aperture all photographers want, however, the lens was somewhat soft at 1.4 requiring that it be stopped down. Stopping down is not a problem, but when you have a ƒ/1.4 lens you will typically want to shoot at ƒ/1.4. 

The Winner : The Mamiya Sekor in our tests was always the sharpest. We don’t just mean on a computer at 100% crop we mean even in camera we could see a difference. The Mamiya was also the easiest and quickest to focus. After each picture we would look at the LCD and could not believe the photos were being taken with a manual focus lens with being hand held with our shaky hands. The Mamiya leaves some bokeh to be desired, however, this lens almost made us think that we could use it for paid work with out thinking twice. We found our results to be impressive considering the lens can be had on ebay for $10-$20 and the M42 adapter on amazon costs $11. It surprised us and would no way shape or form been a lens we would have selected on our own. We hope these photos will help you determine which lens might be right for you and your needs.


Lens Test Galleries


Mamiya Sekor 50mm ƒ/2 M42 Mount


Helios 44-M 58mm ƒ/2  M42 Mount


Minolta Rokkor 58mm ƒ/1.4 @ ƒ/2


Ashai Super Takumar 28mm ƒ/3.5

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